Reviews

Strong Enough? : Thoughts from Thirty Years of Barbell Training
Price: $14.95
  • Average Rating 4.86/5 Stars.
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(4.86 out of 5 with 22 votes)
Product Description:

Strong Enough? Thoughts on Thirty Years of Barbell Training

There are lots of things about weight training in general and barbell exercise in particular that can only be learned by spending way too many hours in the gym. And honestly, unless you are a gym owner, this is a really weird way to spend 75 hours a week. Mark Rippetoe has been in the fitness industry since 1978 and has owned a black-iron gym since 1984. He knows things about lifting weights and training for performance that most other coaches and professionals have never had a chance to learn. This book of essays offers a glimpse into the depths of experience made possible through many years under the bar, and many more years spent helping others under the bar.

 

 

  
Product Details:
Paperback: 204 pages
Publisher: The Aasgaard Company (November 28, 2007)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0976805448
Product Dimensions: 9" x 6"x 0.7"

 

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Why you should be strong
  • Rating 5/5 Stars.
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G Handyside (Farmersville TX) - September 14th 2010
This is an entertaining and informative book. Like this author's previous work, the primary focus is on the correct performance of the basic lifts ( squat, press, deadlift, bench, and clean ).But, this is more than just " nuts and bolts", it is also "hearts and minds".

Rippetoe has thought long and hard about how we should train and why we should train, and his observations on both are enlightening...and somewhat controversial This book is entertaining because all this thoughtful analysis is written with a great deal of humor and insight. I have read and re - read this book and I always come away with something to think about.His passion for lifting and his dedication to those who train is evident throughout.

The chapter on "Good Form" alone is worth the price of the book.